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Raranga Matihiko | Weaving Digital Futures

location_on New Zealand

Empowering learners & teachers to think, challenge & create using authentic integrated experiences.

Through a museum and gallery based partnership, Raranga Matihiko delivers innovative digital technologies to those with limited digital learning opportunities, while increasing access to national and local exhibitions and collections. The programme increases equity by reducing disparity.

HundrED 2022

Overview

HundrED has selected this innovation to

HundrED 2022

2018

Established

13K

Children/users

1

Countries
Organisation
Not-for-profit
Target group
All
Updated
November 22nd, 2022
Raranga Matihiko is a partnership between students, teachers, family and museum educators to learn together through engaging digital technologies, rich experiences and equity of access to learning.
Tara Fagan, Project Director

About the innovation

Why did you create this innovation?

The Raranga Matihiko programme was created to support equity in education, access to rich digital technology learning and equity in access to experiences. The project is led by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in collaboration with its partners. Current partners are Waitangi Treaty Grounds and Auckland Art Gallery.

How does your innovation work in practice?

In Raranga Matihiko the pedagogy supports students, teachers and family to all be learners. Teachers are supported to build their confidence and knowledge in digital technologies and to integrate this learning throughout the curriculum. Family gain knowledge of digital technologies, the rich museum collections and how to support their children. Museum & Gallery educators facilitate, at the museum or gallery, teacher only learning days and teacher and learner learning days with whānau in support. The learning of the teachers and the family means learning opportunities for learners are maximised long after the actual programme is completed. Students are from 5-14 years of age. Each group spends two days at their location museum, with transport provided at no cost.
No single programme is identical. Each class has a bespoke programme plan designed for their learners based on their interests.

How has it been spreading?

The programme builds capability within communities and is transferrable across topics and foci as well as scalable across the country/world. It has delivered over 200,000 learning hours to students.

“Raranga Matihiko is a highly effective and responsive learning system. Its success is the result of positive museum-school relationships built over time; collaboration between museums and museum facilitators; quality programme design that integrates digital technologies with local curriculum, taonga, and histories; expert co-facilitation that models Treaty partnership and caters for both Māori and English-medium settings; and proactive removal of equity barriers to school and student participation.” - Dr Melanie Riwai-Couch, Evaluation Associates, Nov. 2020

If I want to try it, what should I do?

The success of this programme has been co-designing each programme with the community; access to taonga/collection items and museum experiences, excellent facilitators and the focus on equity of experience and learning. We are always happy to talk about how the programme works and what we believe has made it successful.

Impact & scalability

HundrED Academy Reviews
I can imagine that educational practices like Raranga Matihiko can be valuable to any other contexts. Digital skills and personalized learning are getting more and more important while conventional school education has limits in providing them.
Raranga Matihiko offers a great combination of digital technology and learning at museum to the students who may not have an easy access to them easily. The programmes are connected to real life learning as well as digital skills.
- Academy member
Academy review results
High Impact
Low Scalability
High Impact
High Scalability
Low Impact
Low Scalability
Low Impact
High Scalability
Read more about our selection process

Media

Google Image Result
Designed and lead by Te Papa Tongarewa with the support of our partner museumsWaitangi Treaty GroundsAuckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki
RARANGA MATIHIKO | WEAVING DIGITAL FUTURES
The Raranga Matihiko programme delivers innovative digital technologies to those with limited digital learning opportunities, while increasing access to national and local exhibitions and collections. Funded by the Ministry of Education Digital Technologies for All Equity Fund, the project is led by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in collaboration with its partners. Current partners are Waitangi Treaty Grounds and Auckland Art Gallery. Past partners have included MTG Hawke's Bay, Auckland Museum and Waikato Museum.In Raranga Matihiko the pedagogy supports learners, teachers and whānau (family) to all be learners. Teachers are supported to build their confidence and knowledge in digital technologies and to integrate this learning throughout the curriculum. Whānau gain knowledge of digital technologies, the rich museum collections and how to support their children. Museum educators facilitate, at the museum, teacher only learning days and teacher and learner learning days with whānau in support. Outreach visits by museum educators to schools, to build on and extend learning opportunities, are also available. The learning of the teachers and the whānau means learning opportunities for learners are maximised long after the actual programme is completed. Students are from 5-14 years of age.A bespoke approachNo single programme is identical. Each class has a bespoke programme plan designed for their learners. This ensures the needs of the learners are met, and provides support to each learner as they develop digital fluency skills in a cross-curricular approach. This includes building students’ understandings of computational thinking, digital citizenship, and literacy.Throughout the programme, students solve real-world problems, while enriching their knowledge of their communities and regions. Through accessing national and local collections, learners can co-create and curate their own learning using digital technologies. The solutions developed will be shared using a range of digital media. Programme StructureThe programme is delivered over three years. In the first year, students, whānau and their teachers spend two days in the museum engaging with a range of digital technologies, inquiry learning and dual-medium delivery. For many students, this is their first experience of museums. Following the museum learning experience, our facilitators visit the students in their classroom to further the learning that occurred in the museum. Each student has 14 hours of face-to-face learning and experiences spread across a 10 week period. In the second and third years of the programme, students, family and teachers have one-day in the museum with the museum facilitators visiting the classroom. In addition, the museum educators, work with leaders to develop an implementation plan to integrate digital technologies across the school.The programme is provided at no cost to the school. Costs covered include teacher learning day, two-day museum learning experience, transport while visiting the museum, facilitation, and technology use.  EvaluationThe Raranga Matihiko | Weaving Digital Futures project has produced some valuable evidence about what learning could look like in this ecosystem in both Māori and English medium. Learners are supported to participate, solve real-world problems and enhance and enrich their identities. They access the rich national and local collections that the network of museums hold in the public trust and co-create and curate their learning using digital technologies. Learning is responsive to locally based contexts and relevant for all learners, their histories and their stories.  The impact of family and community has the greatest impact of anything on the educational outcomes achieved. Wider than the immediate whānau, and in support, there is untapped and rich resource in communities that can support specialised, relevant and exciting learning (for example the child’s marae, local library or museum, community organisations or place of worship etc.). Research also shows that parents and whānau want to support their children’s learning but they need support do this in a way that is evidence-based and has a positive impact on learning outcomes. If not supported in an evidence-based way well-meaning intentions can have a negative impact. The programme builds capability within communities and is transferrable across topics and foci as well as scalable across the country/world.“Raranga Matihiko is a highly effective and responsive learning system. Its success is the result of positive museum-school relationships built over time; collaboration between museums and museum facilitators; quality programme design that integrates digital technologies with local curriculum, taonga, and histories; expert co-facilitation that models Treaty partnership and caters for both Māori and English-medium settings; and proactive removal of equity barriers to school and student participation.” - Dr Melanie Riwai-Couch, Evaluation Associates, Nov. 2020Raranga Matihiko TVTo support student learning from home during Covid-19, the Raranga Matihiko and Te Papa teams were asked to develop a 16 episode series on using digital technologies in learning. The episodes screened on national television during May and June 2020.What our participants say about the programme"As well as developing digital tech skills it gives learners an opportunity to base their learning around their culture, genealogy, history of Māori and to see themselves at the heart of learning" - Northland Teacher"In my family, doing stuff like that was hardly ever done and it was a new experience. The future of technology is changing rapidly, learning how to use it prepares us" - Auckland based student"For inquiry...it clearly showed me that kids can come up with that, with the right tools they can do this themselves. With more opportunities, kids can decide on that without the kaiako [teacher] driving it all...it should be ākonga-driven [learner driven]. It was PD to show me how to give kids the opportunities and set out the tools and let them come up with what they want to do. It really showed how you need to be less controlling of how things run" - Kaiako [teacher] from Northland.https://rarangamatihiko.com/
Evaluation Reports
The full report can be accessed here:  Evaluation Reports
Ākonga (students), kaiako (teachers) and whānau (family) learning together. Ako is learning. Throughout the three years of the programme, the value of ākonga, kaiako and whānau learning together has been evident. Very rarely do kaiako have the opportunity to undertake their professional learning alongside their ākonga. Together, the class returned to school with shared knowledge and understandings, and professional learning was more likely to be implemented immediately. Ākonga become proficient with the digital technologies and kaiako have a stronger understanding of the revised technology learning area and a deeper understanding of the pedagogy of teaching with digital technologies. The richness of the museum taonga adds an authentic context to the programme. Whanau learning as part of the process, has seen many different outcomes. They learn with the class and take the learning back to their wider family to share. An example of this was in Northland, where whānau used digital tools to capture digital stories from kaumatua. After participating in the Hawke's Bay programme, whānau from different kura are working together to apply for iwi funding to develop an app that will be designed by them and their tamariki. When learning alongside their ākonga and kaiako, whānau have an understanding of how their ākonga are learning in the classroom, and kaiako have opportunities to understand more about whānau aspirations for their tamariki. The ākonga see the people they generally spend the most time with – whānau and kaiako – interacting across two days. During 2021, we will be exploring more about the impact of this three-way learning partnership.
Bringing the curriculum to life
Education Gazette "Bringing the curriculum to life"https://gazette.education.govt.nz/articles/bringing-the-curriculum-to-life/
Students make a splash in their local community
https://gazette.education.govt.nz/articles/students-make-a-splash-in-their-local-community/ Education Gazette "Students making a splash in their local community"
Weaving digital futures
July 2020 Mnistry of Education Gazette Article
Annual Reports
https://bit.ly/RMAnnualReports
Raranga Matihiko TV
During Covid-19, the Raranga Matihiko team were asked by the Ministry of Education to develop a 16 episode television series to support learners at home.  The subject focus of the programme was on digital technologies and screened on national television.The team had 13 working days to conceptualise, develop and write scripts before filming started - all while in Lockdown level 4.The television series can be viewed here: https://rarangamatihiko.com/home-learning
Raranga Matihiko Pilot Programme
Students, teachers, whānau (family) and museum facilitators interacting and learning over a two day period. All delivery occurs in Reo Māori (Māori language). No sound to this video.Pilot programme
9M marae project
Video of student work from Year 9 Social Science Class at Bay of Islands College, Northland

Steps

Provide rich and engaging experiences

We provide a range of rich experiences to support learning and to give our learners access to a range of experiences that they might not have had yet. 

Raranga Matihiko is funded to support digital technology learning however we have designed the programme to provide access to a range of experiences and learning options. This enables students, teachers and family to learn together through an integrated approach that incorporates digital technology, project based learning and museum experiences. This approach often affords many new experiences for our learners including travelling to their local city, exploring their museum, making connections to place and new vocational pathways. When designing a programme of learning, how can you include a range of experiences.

Teacher professional learning alongside student learning

When learning how to use and integrate digital technologies into a class programme, we have designed it so teachers and students learn together.  Before we start working with a class, we have a teacher only day that introduces the revised technology learning area that focuses on digital technologies.  We also work with teachers to co-design a learning programme for their class that integrates digital technologies with the class inquiry or project for the term.  This ensures that learning new content is not an additional extra that needs to be incorporated into the day rather it is built into the programme plan.  With the students being part of the two-day programme, then along with their own learning, teachers have a class of experts so the knowledge is shared.

We have also developed a range of teacher professional learning resources which teachers can use as needed.  These include paper resources, videos and webinars.  Our resource collection can be accessed at:  rarangamatihiko.com

Building Community partnerships

The Raranga Matihiko programme builds partnerships between museums and schools; doing so in meaningful ways to support the class curriculum. The museums have become a place for teacher professional learning through:

• modelling good teaching practices through co-facilitation. This provides teachers with the opportunity to observe their students respond to other teachers' along with different facilitation strategies.

• drawing on specialist expertise. Museums and other local community groups have specific expertise on hand that can help support teachers

• building a network of teachers through teacher only days

• helping teachers with curriculum integration, weaving digital technologies, literacy, numeracy and other subject areas together.

Future iterations of Raranga Matihiko intend to widen the community organisations involved in order to provide seamless community learning programmes and support for schools.


Learning Hours

One of the changes that we made in the first year was to report the number of learning hours. We did this to reflect the depth and richness of the programme.  While 3,841 students across four regions is impressive, without context or knowledge of the programme, people might assume that students only received 1-2hours of faciltiation and support. Counting learning hours in addition to student numbers provided a more accurate reflection of the learning and programme.  

In 2018, we worked with 3,841 students which equated to over 43,456 learning hours.  We also report the number of teachers and whānau/family that we work with which for 2018 included over 200 teachers and more than 321 whānau.

In 2019, the programme worked with 6,821 students and over 70,000 student learning hours.  We also worked with over 250 teachers and more than 740 whānau/family.

Evaluation

Researching for effectiveness is crucial for any programme whether it be internal reflection evaluation or external evaluation.  Annual case studies from each site along with an overall programme evaluation helps shape the design of the programme.

The external evaluation reports, including overall evaluation, and museum case-studies, can be viewed here:  Raranga Matihiko Evaluation

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