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Eren Fernandez

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Kids learn to regulate their emotions and build empathy skills as they explore tech through hands-on projects that promote wellbeing.

The Cube School of Technology: empowering a new generation of balanced technologists

Toronto, Canada
A tech school where teaching resilience, self-regulation, and empathy are central to every effort. As kids explore hands-on tech projects and build social/emotional skills they get comfortable with the unknown. A Child & Youth worker plays a critical role on the multidisciplinary team, teaching kids how to empathize, communicate their concerns, process complex problems, and regulate their emotions
Introduction

The Cube School of Technology: empowering a future generation of balanced technologists.

Eren Fernandez, Founder, The Cube School of Technology
“We want to help children build a healthier inner dialog. If we don’t help them understand their emotions, self-regulate, and build empathy, we leave out an opportunity to help them in the future.”

Eren Fernandez, Founder, The Cube School of Technology

What we do? We want future technologists to build products for the greater good, so we teach children how to practice empathy, resilience, and emotional well-being while learning about technology.

Why we do it?  Years ago, Eren Fernandez watched the pressure mount as her engineering colleague’s stress, anxiety and isolation ratcheted upward. But the day he threw his work computer into a pool, loaded with all the code he had written for their new product release, she knew it was time to make a change. As a technologist herself, Eren knew the value of harnessing tech for the greater good. She also understood the pressures her colleague felt. She also sees that kids today are feeling a lot of pressure to learn technology and excel. To prevent a new generation of technologists from emotional suffering, Eren realized that future coders needed training that also focused on their emotional well-being. 

So she started The Cube School of Technology where teaching resilience, self-regulation, and empathy are central to every technology class and project. It's an emotionally safe space where kids feel comfortable while exploring how tech works. They discover the fun, creative, collaborative aspects of coding and robotics while also building skills for long-term emotional wellness. To achieve this goal, a child & youth worker plays a critical role within the multidisciplinary team by helping kids practice their social and emotional skills while doing tech projects. Children learn to work together, communicate their concerns, embrace the unknown, work through complex problems, and regulate their emotions. Eren and her team know these skills will be useful throughout their lives as they use technology and well beyond.




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Innovation Overview
6 - 18
Age Group
150
Children/Users
1
Country
2016
Established
For-profit
Organisation
72
Views
Tips for implementation
The teaching team should include a social/emotional (SEL) specialist, who works with tech instructors to create programs. The SEL specialist should also work directly with the kids as they are learning, particularly when they’re struggling with a challenging concept or working together as a team.
Connect with innovator
E
Eren Fernandez
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01
Talk about it!
Start the conversation: Talk about what frustration looks like and provide a set of tools students can use when faced with difficulties while learning new subjects.
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