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Erase All Kittens is an innovative web-based platform game, designed from the ground-up to eliminate the fear that girls have of technology

Erase All Kittens

location_on London, United Kingdom
EAK is totally unique, because as players progress they can edit the real code that governs the game environment - building and fixing levels as they play. Kids can learn coding languages such as HTML to save kittens in a fantasy internet universe. Our approach has been to design a game that girls genuinely love - one that places a huge emphasis on creativity and feels more like a mainstream game
Here is what Noa Wigdortz, the eight year old daughter of the CEO of Teach First, said about E.A.K. after playing - “I never did coding before, and didn’t know what it was, but now I know it’s fun. I wish there were more levels. I’m sure girls would like it if they knew how fun it was.”

Dee Saigal, CEO

Overview

HundrED shortlisted this innovation

HundrED has shortlisted this innovation to one of its innovation collections. The information on this page has been checked by HundrED.
Key figures

Innovation Overview

8 - 13
Age Group
-
Children/Users
1
Country
2014
Established
-
Organisation
1 178
Views
Updated on February 1st, 2021
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about the innovation

Inspiring the next generation of girls to code

Erase All Kittens is a web-based platform game that will teaches kids aged 8-14 real coding languages, and helps to eliminate their fear of technology by gamifying the learning process. This project would provide a new, innovative way to help close the gender gap in technology.


Other code education tools aren’t designed to appeal to girls, and they also don’t teach real-world coding languages - only the concepts of coding (e.g. computational thinking). E.A.K. is disruptive as it will be incredibly engaging to girls - we immersed ourselves in the culture of our target audience to invent a gamified, story-driven approach to teach new skills. E.A.K. is also unique because as players progress, they can edit the code that governs the game environment, i.e. learning by building and fixing levels as they play.

We have collected data from 12,000 feedback forms - from children who have played E.A.K.

It has been found that less than 18% of girls are learning to code, after school. 55% of all E.A.K’s 130,000 players are girls, and 95% want to learn more about code, after playing.


Since 2015, we have received thousands of messages, from children, teachers, parents and organisations, wanting more levels, and to know when the full game will be released.


In 2015 we beta-tested E.A.K. at Oasis Academies, a group of 47 schools in the UK, with huge success (see: http://agent4change.net/ed-resources/2416-what-s-up-pussycat-pupils-who-erase-kittens). After twelve months of beta-testing, several Oasis teachers and Liz Hankin, the educational consultant for Oasis schools, summarised that E.A.K. didn’t just successfully teach girls to code - it encouraged them to become researchers, teachers, problem solvers, team builders, writers and designers, as well as coders.

Solely through word-of-mouth, the new version of E.A.K. (60 minutes content) already has 130,000 players around the world - 30% from the UK, and 44% from the US. 

Our extensive research on girls and code education has been printed in several UK publications this year, including Newsweek, 

(see:http://europe.newsweek.com/gender-gap-tech-widening-stem-coding-gaming-546899) 


Business Reporter (see: https://business-reporter.co.uk/2017/05/19/mission-inspire-girls-code/) and The Huffington Post (see http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jimmy-leach/the-solution-to-the-loomi_b_13168608.html)


We have recently partnered with CoderDojo (1600+ code clubs globally) and this year, we are planning on making the biggest impact in Lebanon and Damascus - working with Techfugees on E.A.K coding workshops for girls. We are also creating a “Global E.A.K.” initiative where thousands of E.A.K. accounts will be given to girls in less developed areas of the world, who have access to computers at school.



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May 2019
500 views
February 2018
Innovation page created on HundrED.org
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